Spotlight on: Carmen Almon

American Artist Carmen Almon makes the most exquisite hyper-real botanical structures. And far from being delicate models, her pieces are made from sturdy and durable wire and copper, fashioned into the most meticulous detail.  Artificial flowers have gained popularity in recent years, as technological advances make them more realistic and affordable, but Almon’s creations are works of art and make for a far more interesting centrepiece.

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Originally inspired by the 18th Century collages of Mary Delany (on display in the British Museum), Almon began cutting sheets of copper into petals and soldering them together with brass fill to make them slightly raised 3D sculptures of flowers and plants. She then painted them with enamel and oil washes and the result was an instant hit.

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Now living in France with her Sculptor husband Thierry Job, Almon hand crafts up to 4 plants a month, using nail scissors, pliers, cutters and paint. Recently she has begun adding a distinctive finishing touch to each plant – usually something like a ladybird or bug, hidden away. She says this helps to ‘fix the moment in time’, in the way a photo would.  Given the intensive labour involved in each creation, expect to see prices from £1200 – 35,000. Almon usually works to commission for private collectors although she does display at a few galleries, such as the Chinese Porcelain Company in New York and the Octavia Gallery in New Orleans.

Her main interests are Vegetables, Flowers and Fruit. Most full flowers (she also does ‘clippings’) come in pots, but I prefer the exposed roots. It gives a more interesting and curious perspective and highlights the contrast between the fragility and strength.

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An artichoke with exposed roots

20160922_114103_resizedIf you’d like to discuss how you could fill your house with interesting and unusual designs, contact Kia Designs today for a free consultation.

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